Rodgers Revealed

Richard Rodgers

Richard Rodgers

The duo that put together Bernstein Revealed at St James Studio has reprised a former show of similar format, Rodgers Revealed, this time at North London venue JW3 Edward Seckerson and Jason Carr draw upon their vast knowledge of the scores and the stories behind them to create an intimate evening exploring the life and music of one of the most popular composers of theatre music.

Incredibly prolific, Richard Rodgers wrote more than 40 musicals and over 1,000 songs – more than Franz Schubert, and as Seckerson points out “with much smarter lyrics!”  Most of these were penned by Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein, two personalities that could not have been more different.

As with Bernstein Revealed, the results of years of in-depth research are engagingly delivered by host Seckerson, and further enriched by banter with the equally knowledgeable and eloquent Carr illustrating points at the piano, and songs sung by a West End leading lady, this time by Olivier Award nominee Anna Francolini.

There is a good balance of old favourites, such as South Pacific‘s Wonderful Guy and the heart-renderingly beautiful What’s the Use of Wondrin’ from Carousel, and rarely performed jewels like the poignant Nobody’s Heart from Jupiter and The Gentleman is a Dope from Allegro, initially a flop, but is soon to receive its European premier at Southwark Playhouse.

As ever, Carr plays his arrangements superbly with both sensitivity and great virtuosity, as the occasion demands. By sharing the contexts of the songs, such as ballerina Natalia Makarova’s backflips in Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, both Seckerson and Carr furnish us with an insight into these riveting instrumental solos.

Francolini sings with a wonderful Eartha Kitt style purr, captures the New York cadence beautifully in Manhattan and fairly bites on the rhymes in the lyrics. Her light delicate touch on To Keep My Love Alive, ending on a rich low note was a masterclass in delivering a comic song.

The team also indulged in an amusing moment of musical interpretation of Rodgers’ work (which Rodgers himself notoriously took great exception to – to the point of publicly berating the stars that had the temerity to do it) on Falling In Love With Love.

Serendipitously, on the night of the European Referendum, we were treated to Stephen Sondheim’s witty number This Week Americans, which features some dry observations on the behaviour of certain Europeans. Sondheim’s relationship with Rodgers was difficult, but fruitful and it was particularly interesting to hear this infrequently performed item from their collaboration Do I Hear A Waltz?

I also enjoyed the encore medley of Edelweiss, Hammerstein’s last lyric, and Carr’s excellent jazz arrangement of My Favourite Things, but the song of the evening was without question Francolini’s extraordinary rendition of Bewitched from Pal Joey.  Tortured, fascinated and potently attracted to a man she shouldn’t be, Francolini lets us in to the character’s internal struggle with the rights, wrongs and inevitabilities of the issue, so that the listener hears the lyrics wholly anew.

A magical evening greatly appreciated by the audience.

 

Fiona-Jane Weston

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About Fiona Jane Weston

I am Fiona-Jane Weston and as well as being a performer myself (see website), I write reviews of and features on shows, mainly on the London cabaret and theatre scene. I have worked in theatre for many years, but decided to embark on a new direction in cabaret in 2009, when I produced 20th Century Woman: The Compact Cabaret. Not wanting to neglect my love of spoken word, particularly drama and verse, I made the conscious decision to include these elements in the programme, as well as wonderful songs, to tell the story of women's changing status and preoccupations throughout the 20th Century and up to now. I was invited to audition for the renowned Cabaret Conference at Yale, run by the late legendary Erv Raible, and that was thrilled to be one of only 26 accepted that year, where I was taught by the masters of the genre. Amanda McBroom (composer of the Bette Middler hit "The Rose" and the poignant "Errol Flynn"), Laurel Massé, original member of Manhattan Transfer, Sally Mayes, Tony Award nominees Sharon McNight and Tovah Feldshuh, and New York cabaret veteran Julie Wilson were all on the faculty. We were also treated to the musical direction of Alex Rybeck, Hubert Tex Arnold and the now late Paul Trueblood. With the benefit of their insightful teaching and great encouragement, I took my show to The Duplex in New York, where I was delighted with the response. Since then, I have produced Loving London: The Capital Cabaret, using the same format of songs, poetry and drama, in various London venues, including Leicester Square Theatre and The Crazy Coqs. 2014, the centenary of World War 1, saw the launch of Wartime Women: the Khaki Cabaret to a sellout house at St. James Theatre, London, garnering great notices, including from The Times and Musical Theatre Review. I have since been touring the show to Belgium and throughout the UK. I hope these reviews and interviews entertain and educate at the same time, and if please do leave comments in the box. It's great to engage in a conversation about the Arts. Fiona-Jane Weston
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